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Searching for Shelley Duvall: Reclusive Icon on Fleeing Hollywood and Scars of Making 'SHINING'...

Seth Abramovitch

Searching for Shelley Duvall: Reclusive Icon on Fleeing Hollywood and Scars of Making 'SHINING'...

Shelley Duvall
Shelley Duvall Bernice Bobs Her Hair 1977.JPG
Duvall in 1977
Born (1949-07-07) July 7, 1949 (age 71)
OccupationActress
Years active1970–2002
Works
Full list
Spouse(s)
Bernard Sampson
(m. 1970; div. 1974)
Partner(s)Paul Simon (1976–1978)
Dan Gilroy (1989–present)

Shelley Alexis Duvall (born July 7, 1949) is an American former actress who is best known for her portrayals of various eccentric characters. She has received numerous accolades, which include a Cannes Film Festival Award, a Peabody Award, two Emmy Award nominations, and a BAFTA Award nomination.

Duvall began her career in the 1970s, appearing in various films by director Robert Altman, including Brewster McCloud (1970), McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971), Thieves Like Us (1974), Nashville (1975), the latter of which brought her recognition. She had her breakthrough with the thriller 3 Women (1977), also directed by Altman, for which she earned critical acclaim, receiving the Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actress and also earning a nomination for the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role. She also had a supporting role in Annie Hall (1977).

In the 1980s, Duvall starred in lead roles as Olive Oyl in Altman's Popeye (1980) and Wendy Torrance in Stanley Kubrick's horror film The Shining (1980). She subsequently appeared in Terry Gilliam's fantasy film Time Bandits (1981), the short comedy-horror film Frankenweenie (1984), and the comedy Roxanne (1987). Duvall also ventured into producing television programming aimed at children and youth; she created, hosted and appeared in Faerie Tale Theatre (1982–1987) and Tall Tales & Legends (1985–1987), the latter of which earned an Emmy Award nomination in 1988, followed by the young adult-aimed horror series Nightmare Classics (1989), which she created and produced.

In the 1990s, Duvall continued to appear in film, including supporting roles in Steven Soderbergh's thriller The Underneath (1995) and the Henry James adaptation The Portrait of a Lady (1996), directed by Jane Campion. Her last performance was in Manna from Heaven (2002), after which she retired from acting.