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Trump era in Atlantic City to end with a blast Wednesday with implosion of Trump Plaza

New Brunswick, New Jersey
City of New Brunswick
Along the Raritan
Along the Raritan
Nickname(s): 
Hub City, Healthcare City
Location within Middlesex County Interactive map of New Brunswick, New Jersey
Location within Middlesex County
Interactive map of New Brunswick, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of New Brunswick, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of New Brunswick, New Jersey
New Brunswick is located in Middlesex County, New Jersey
New Brunswick
New Brunswick
Location in Middlesex County
New Brunswick is located in New Jersey
New Brunswick
New Brunswick
Location in New Jersey
New Brunswick is located in the United States
New Brunswick
New Brunswick
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°29′12″N 74°26′40″W / 40.486678°N 74.444414°W / 40.486678; -74.444414Coordinates: 40°29′12″N 74°26′40″W / 40.486678°N 74.444414°W / 40.486678; -74.444414[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMiddlesex
EstablishedDecember 30, 1730
IncorporatedSeptember 1, 1784
Named forBraunschweig, Germany or King George II of Great Britain
Government
 • TypeFaulkner Act (mayor–council)
 • BodyCity Council
 • MayorJames M. Cahill (D, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorDaniel A. Torrisi[5]
 • Municipal clerkLeslie Zeledón[6]
Area
 • Total5.75 sq mi (14.90 km2)
 • Land5.23 sq mi (13.55 km2)
 • Water0.52 sq mi (1.35 km2)  9.06%
Area rank264th of 565 in state
14th of 25 in county[1]
Elevation62 ft (19 m)
Population
 • Total55,181
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
55,676
 • Rank27th of 566 in state
5th of 25 in county[13]
 • Density10,556.4/sq mi (4,075.8/km2)
 • Density rank689th in country (as of 2019)[14]
34th of 566 in state
2nd of 25 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
08901–08906, 08933, 08989[15][16]
Area code(s)732/848 and 908[17]
FIPS code3402351210[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID0885318[1][20]
Websitewww.cityofnewbrunswick.org
New Brunswick is the county seat for Middlesex County.
If I had to fall I wish it had been on the sidewalks of New York, not the sidewalks of New Brunswick, N.J.

Alfred E. Smith to Lew Dockstader in December 1923 on Dockstader's fall at what is now the State Theater.[21]

New Brunswick is a city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. The city is the county seat of Middlesex County,[22] and is the home of Rutgers University. The city is both a regional commercial hub for the Central New Jersey region and a prominent and growing commuter town for residents commuting to New York City within the New York metropolitan area. New Brunswick is on the Northeast Corridor rail line, 27 miles (43 km) southwest of Manhattan. The city is located on the southern banks of the Raritan River in the Raritan Valley region.

For 2019, New Brunswick had a Census-estimated population of 55,676,[12] representing a 0.9% increase from the 55,181 people enumerated at the 2010 United States Census,[9][10][11] which in turn had reflected an increase of 6,608 (+13.6%) from the 48,573 counted in the 2000 Census.[23] The Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program calculated that the city's population was 55,676 in 2019,[12] ranking the city the 689th-most-populous in the country.[14] Due to the concentration of medical facilities in the area, including Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Saint Peter's University Hospital, as well as Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey's Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick is known as both the Hub City and the Healthcare City.[24][25] The corporate headquarters and production facilities of several global pharmaceutical companies are situated in the city, including Johnson & Johnson and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

New Brunswick is noted for its ethnic diversity. At one time, one quarter of the Hungarian population of New Jersey resided in the city and in the 1930s one out of three city residents was Hungarian.[26] The Hungarian community continues as a cohesive community, with the 3,200 Hungarian residents accounting for 8% of the population of New Brunswick in 1992.[27] Growing Asian and Hispanic communities have developed around French Street near Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital.

  1. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990 , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference Mayor was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Administration Staff, City of New Brunswick. Accessed December 11, 2019.
  6. ^ Leslie Zeledón Appointed as New City Clerk City of New Brunswick. Accessed December 11, 2019. "New Brunswick City Council appointed Leslie R. Zeledón as the new City Clerk at its 2019 Reorganization Meeting at City Hall. Zeledón has served as Deputy Clerk for the City of New Brunswick since September 2011. She replaces longtime City Clerk Daniel A. Torrisi, who was appointed by Mayor Cahill to serve as City Administrator."
  7. ^ Cite error: The named reference DataBook was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  8. ^ "City of New Brunswick". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved March 8, 2013.
  9. ^ a b DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for New Brunswick city, Middlesex County, New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference Districts2011 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  11. ^ a b Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for New Brunswick city Archived 2014-01-17 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b c Cite error: The named reference PopEst was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 23, 2012.
  14. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places of 50,000 or More, Ranked by July 1, 2019 Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 1, 2020. Note that townships (including Edison, Lakewood and Woodbridge, all of which have larger populations) are excluded from these rankings.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for New Brunswick, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed April 18, 2012.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 18, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for New Brunswick, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 6, 2014.
  18. ^ U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ Staff. "Lew Dockstader, Minstrel, Is Dead. Famous Comedian Succumbs to a Bone Tumor at His Daughter's Home at 68", The New York Times, October 27, 1924. Accessed May 18, 2015.
  22. ^ New Jersey County Map, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed July 10, 2017.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010 Archived August 7, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 23, 2012.
  24. ^ "7:30 a.m.—Filling cracks in the health care city", Home News Tribune, September 23, 1999. "With two major hospitals and a medical school, New Brunswick proclaims itself The Healthcare City."
  25. ^ "A wet day in the Hub City", Home News Tribune, September 23, 1999. "A few days short of 60 years, on Wednesday, Sept. 16, a dreary, drizzly day just ahead of the deluge of Hurricane Floyd, the Home News Tribune sent 24 reporters, 9 photographers and one artist into the Hub City, as it is known, to take a peek into life in New Brunswick as it is in 1999."
  26. ^ Weiss, Jennifer. "Redevelopment; As New Brunswick Grows, City's Hungarians Adapt", The New York Times, July 16, 2006. Accessed December 11, 2019. "While the Hungarian community has diminished over the years—in the 1930s it made up a third of New Brunswick's population—much of what it built remains."
  27. ^ Cite error: The named reference NYT1992 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
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